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Letter: Recycling critical minerals needs to be central in energy transition

Editor: Canada is putting $7.5 million into critical minerals processing in Canada. Prime Minister Trudeau recently toured a rare minerals processing plant in Saskatoon, and Canada recently approved a new lithium mine in Quebec.

Editor: 

Canada is putting $7.5 million into critical minerals processing in Canada. Prime Minister Trudeau recently toured a rare minerals processing plant in Saskatoon, and Canada recently approved a new lithium mine in Quebec. This is all positive news in terms of Canada’s program to electrify society and get to net zero carbon emissions. Missing from any of the articles on Canada’s critical minerals policy, however, is any discussion of recycling and how Canada plans to build critical minerals recycling into its energy transition. The essential energy and economic transition, defeating climate change, restoring biodiversity, building a sustainable future, none of this can be achieved if we do not transition to a circular economy where the goods we make and use are returned to the raw materials stream and reused instead of being tossed aside. The importance of recycling is mentioned in Canada’s critical minerals policy. It needs to be front and centre and integrated into the policy and planning for our energy transition. Otherwise, we will simply dig ourselves a deeper hole. 

Michael Healey 

Gibsons 

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