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Halfmoon Happenings: Spotlight on…our trails!

Halfmoon Bay’s trail network affords endless opportunities to hike or bike through the natural beauty of our forests, with 200 km or more stretching from Sargeant Bay to Wood Bay, and right across the peninsula (check out trails apps AllTrails or Trailforks).

Halfmoon Bay’s trail network affords endless opportunities to hike or bike through the natural beauty of our forests, with 200 km or more stretching from Sargeant Bay to Wood Bay, and right across the peninsula (check out trails apps AllTrails or Trailforks). There’s a book to be written about trail name origins – Pterodactyl Trail (named for the shape of a fallen tree) and Datsun Alley (an abandoned car, covered in forest growth). Many hiking groups meet regularly – I joined the ladies who meet on Monday and Wednesday afternoons. This week, we hiked the Connor Park trails, I was in awe of the beauty around us, and the fortitude of these ladies and Riley (Leslie Broadhurst’s enthusiastic dog!). 

The network is maintained by volunteer “trail elves”, some of whom take a chainsaw safety course for trail clean-up. Two of them are installing easy-to-read maps and trail markers on the Truman Road trails. Andy Jones-Cox said, “Now we won’t have lost visitors roaming the trails looking for their cars this summer.” Soon all will be outfitted with safety vests emblazoned with the Halfmoon Bay Community Association logo so they are easily recognizable by trail users. Report windfall and other damage to trails@halfmoon-bay.ca. Donations can be made via the collection cans at the Welcome Woods Store, Fawns Road Stand, and through the HBCA website. 

My knowledge of our many trails has increased recently, ever since Elise and the “Trails” responsibility moved from the Halfmoon Bay Environmental Society to the HBCA (information will soon to be relocated to the HBCA website). Elise has been involved in land use, parks and greenway planning and forestry operationsal plans, and has volunteered for many non-profits including the Sunshine Coast Trails Society, the Sunshine Coast Community Forest board, and the Halfmoon Bay Environmental Society. She is a volunteer “extraordinaire” and we are grateful for her tireless spirit! 

On April 22, starting from Trout Lake, Elise Rudland and several trail elves will lead groups to clear windfall, salal and other debris. If you see them during your hike, please stop and thank them for their hard work. As coincidence would have it, April 22  is Earth Day…why not take a hike along our network of trails in celebration of this part of the planet that we call home? 

Speaking of trails, some of you may have noticed that the SCRD Parks Division has closed a section of the O’Brian/Mintie Road connector trail in George Cormack Park. This trail is important to the local community so the work to re-route and re-open the trail to public access will be completed as soon as possible. If you have questions, contact parks@scrd.ca. 

My next column will be about the efforts of local beekeepers to save our bee population and educate the community. If you have any topics, a community event, or story you would like to see featured, contact me at mcmahonlinda8138@gmail.com.